IN PHOTOS: Death and destruction in Indonesia

Rappler.com

This is AI generated summarization, which may have errors. For context, always refer to the full article.

IN PHOTOS: Death and destruction in Indonesia

AFP

A volcano-triggered tsunami leaves a trail of dead bodies after slamming without warning into beaches around Sunda Strait

MANILA, Philippines – Over 200 have died and at least a thousand people have been injured after a tsunami slammed without warning the beaches around Indonesia’s Sunda Strait.

The tsunami struck the coast of southern Sumatra and the western tip of Java on Saturday night, December 22, after a volcano known as the “child” of Krakatoa erupted, according to Indonesia’s national disaster agency.

The destructive wave left a trail of uprooted trees and debris strewn across beaches. A tangled mess of corrugated steel roofing, timber, and rubble were dragged inland at Carita beach, a popular spot for day-trippers on the west coast of Java. (READ: Shocking video shows tsunami rip through stage as band performs).

MASSIVE DAMAGE. An aerial photo shows damaged buildings in Carita. Photo by Azwar Ipank/AFP

 

RUIN. Debris from damaged buildings and cars are seen near the beach in Anyer, Serang. Photo by Dasril Roszandi/AFP
REMNANTS. The swimming pool of a hotel near a beach in Anyer, Serang. Photo by Dasril Roszandi/AFP
BODY COUNT. A rescuer counts the bodies of victims at a makeshift mortuary in Carita. Photo by Demy Sanjaya/AFP
ANGUISH. A man grieves beside the body of his child in South Lampung, South Sumatra. Photo by Ferdi Awed/AFP
THE DEAD. Rescuers remove the body of a victim along the coast in South Lampung, South Sumatra. Photo by Ferdi Awed/AFP
INJURED. Survivors receive treatment at a hospital in Carita. Photo by Semi/AFP

Just recently in the city of Palu on Sulawesi island a quake and tsunami in September killed thousands of people.

On December 26, 2004 a tsunami triggered by a magnitude 9.3 undersea earthquake off the coast of Sumatra in western Indonesia killed 220,000 people in countries around the Indian Ocean, including 168,000 in Indonesia. – Rappler.com

Add a comment

Sort by

There are no comments yet. Add your comment to start the conversation.

Summarize this article with AI
Download the Rappler App!