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FACT CHECK: The Bible doesn’t predict the US’ downfall

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FACT CHECK: The Bible doesn’t predict the US’ downfall
There are no specific Biblical references to the United States in end time prophecy, contrary to claims in a YouTube video.

Claim: A YouTube video claims that the Bible mentions the downfall of the United States, which would signify the end of the world.

Around the 1:45 mark, the video says: “Hindi nakakagulat na maging ang United States of America, na binabanggit sa Bibliya, ay talaga namang babagsak at ito ang hudyat at katapusan ng ating mundo.”

(It is not surprising that even the United States of America, which is mentioned in the Bible, will fall and its collapse will signal the end of our world.)

Rating: FALSE

Why we fact-checked this: The video was posted on the channel “Sa Iyong Araw” with 207,000 subscribers. As of writing, the video has over 27,000 views and 1,500 likes.

No mention in the Bible: Interpretations of the Bible and end time prophecy are the subjects of scholarly debate, including theories about whether certain countries are named or referred to in biblical passages. 

Though the Bible sometimes mentions catastrophes within nations, the video’s claim that the US and its prophesied downfall is explicitly mentioned in the Bible is false. “United States of America” or “America” do not appear anywhere in the main text of the King James, Christian Standard, Magandang Balita Biblia, or New International versions of the book.

The video also makes reference to “The Beast”, mentioned in the Book of Revelation and often associated with end time prophecy. While the video says that the beast is “represented by the US,” no Bible passages support this claim.

Unfulfilled prophecies: Apocalyptic prophecies have been around for years. Some recent failed doomsday predictions include the Mayan prophecy that claimed the world would end on December 21, 2012, and Grigori Rasputin’s prediction that a “terrible storm” would end all life on earth on August 23, 2013. Miguel Batallones/Rappler.com

Miguel Batallones is a graduate of Rappler’s fact-checking mentorship program. This fact check was reviewed by a member of Rappler’s research team and a senior editor. Learn more about Rappler’s fact-checking mentorship program here.

Keep us aware of suspicious Facebook pages, groups, accounts, websites, articles, or photos in your network by contacting us at factcheck@rappler.com. Let us battle disinformation one Fact Check at a time.

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