Dapitan City

Dapitan gets Rizal monument replica as gift as it marks 59 years of being a city

Gualberto Laput
Dapitan gets Rizal monument replica as gift as it marks 59 years of being a city

GIFT. A 3D replica of the Jose Rizal: The Filipino Scientist Monument is now on display at a museum in Dapitan City.

Gualberto Laput/Rappler

The DOST gift to Dapitan comes ahead of the commemoration of the national hero's arrival in Dapitan on July 17, 1892, and departure on July 26, 1896

ZAMBOANGA DEL NORTE, Philippines – The Department of Science and Technology (DOST) gifted historic Dapitan a 3D replica of the Jose Rizal: The Filipino Scientist Monument as it marked its 59th year as a city on Wednesday, June 22.

Another replica of the original monument at the DOST national office in Taguig City was given to Calamba, Rizal’s hometown in Laguna province, on Sunday, June 19.

The Dapitan replica, made of Acrylonitrile Styrene Acrylate (ASA), now stands at the Museo ni Jose Rizal-Dapitan in the village of Talisay. The museum at the Rizal Park is under the care of the National Historical Commission of the Philippines (NHCP).

The DOST gift to Dapitan came ahead of the commemoration of the national hero’s arrival in the city on July 17, 1892, and departure on July 26, 1896.

On June 22, 1963, then-President Diosdado Macapagal signed Republic Act 3811, which made Dapitan a city mainly on its historical significance with Trece Martires City in Cavite as its antecedent.

The monument reflects the works of Dr. Rizal in Dapitan, depicting him giving a book to his students.

It also shows the flying lizard and frog species discovered by Rizal, a water system he developed, and a woman representing Dapitanons who benefited from it.

DOST Secretary Fortunato dela Peña said the monument and its replicas serve as a reminder of the national hero’s contribution to science and technology during his four-year exile in Dapitan.

From 1892-1896, Rizal demonstrated his knowledge and skills in medical science, engineering, agriculture, and as an environmentalist, among others, said Dela Peña.

Museo ni Jose Rizal-Dapitan guide Albert Vincent Barretto said the hero was productive even while he was in exile in Dapitan.

“Instead of criticizing the Spanish government and the Church, Rizal made the dam, designed the plaza, put up street lights, and introduced modern agriculture, and new ways of fishing to show people that they can survive, and even improve their lives by themselves without the dictates of the Spaniards.”

Baretto added, “He practiced medicine for free; he opened a school and organized a cooperative so Dapitanons – and hopefully, the rest of the Filipinos – may grow educated, developed, know how to protect their rights, interests, and be caring for each other.” – Rappler.com